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Wednesday, December 04, 2019

The Top Ten Questions About CBD


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Everything you need to know about the cannabidiol compound found in hemp.



There seems to be a CBD (cannabidiol) product almost everywhere you look: CBD-infused watersoapgummies, tinctures, oils, and creams. There are entire shops dedicated to CBD, and no doubt your favorite celebrity or fitness influencer has been touting a new CBD sponsorship or company. 

But all of this CBD buzz (no pun intended) may leave you with a lot of questions and misinformation about what CBD is, what it does, what you should look out for, and who it’s good for. How do you know what you’re getting is even CBD?
Don’t despair, we’re here to answer the biggest questions swirling around the cannabis compound and educate you just a bit more on whether or not CBD is right for you.
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It ONLY comes from marijuana, right?
Wrong. Cannabidiol is in a class of chemical compounds called cannabinoids and is found in many plants like hops, black pepper, and echinacea—not just marijuana—that can also be made naturally in the body, says Bomi Joseph, Ph.D., director of the Peak Health Foundation and noted plant compound researcher.
“This molecule is not unique to the cannabis plant, but it may not be economically feasible to get out of other plants because the levels are too low.”

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What does CBD do?
CBD binds to receptors in the body and regulates your immune system, which helps with its functioning and the healing process. CBD can tamp down inflammation and speed up tissue recovery.
Research has also shown that the compound can help manage epilepsy, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, and depression.

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Will it get me high?
Nope.
Although the molecule is found in marijuana (at low levels) and hemp (at high levels), it won’t give you the munchies. Its mode of activeness is completely independent of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), the psychoactive constituent of cannabis, says Joseph.

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Will CBD appear on a drug test?
No, it’s not a compound that is tested for during drug screens.

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So it’s legal?
Well, it depends. CBD derived from hemp is OK, thanks to a 2018 federal law that delisted it as a restricted substance. However, CBD from cannabis is still a controlled substance. Also, some states and municipalities—such as New York City and Virginia—have laws on the books that restrict CBD sales or use.


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Can kids and teens take it?
CBD is generally considered safe for widespread use. However, its effects on developing minds and bodies are still unknown. There are very few studies on how it affects teens and kids, and some doctors have advised they should not use it unless otherwise recommended.

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How much CBD should I take?
It’s hard to pin down an optimum dose, Joseph says, as it depends on the concentration of CBD that’s in a product and other factors such as age, weight, and height. But he recommends 10mg of CBD per day for a 5'9" male, and 15mg for a guy who is 6'2" and athletic.
It’s best to start out with a low dose and see how you feel.

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Will taking more CBD make it work better?
No. Some research shows that, at some point, CBD will stop working if you take too much of it. Davis Mersereau, the founder of the CBD/THC skin-care company Divios, adds that its effects will plateau if you take too much of it.
Additionally, you shouldn’t be taking it every day, either, unless it’s for a chronic condition. 
For one, it’s fairly expensive—a 1,000mg bottle costs around $100. And if you’re already healthy, there doesn’t seem to be any benefit to using it on a daily basis.
“Though there are many, many positive side effects, I don’t really suggest that people take things that they don’t feel the effects of or if they don’t have that particular problem,” says Prudence Hall, medical director of the Hall Center, a wellness facility in Santa Monica, CA. “If they’re dealing with anxiety or sleeplessness, depression, or inflammatory illnesses, this is a very cool way to help and interrupt that problem.”

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Are there any side effects?
Not really. It could cause a little more fatigue in some individuals, says Hall. “Usually what I’ll hear from patients when I hear anything negative at all, is that it just didn’t have any effect.”

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What’s the best way to purchase CBD?
You can buy it online and from local shops, but sites like Amazon may restrict the sales of certain CBD products. Here is one that is sold on Amazon.
“The big banks are still not wanting to work so much with CBD,” says Mersereau. “That impacts a lot of online payment gateways.” Other drawbacks to the confusion around selling CBD is the fact that there are regulations for sales and marketing on traditional ad platforms, he says. 
Avoid anything sold at a convenience store or big chain if the source of the CBD is unclear. 
Most high-quality CBD comes from the United States or Canada. A lot of sketchy, synthetic CBD is flooding the market from China. Shopping online, at reputable sources, is usually the best option because good purveyors will provide links to third-­party testing documents that show their product is top-notch.
As a consumer, you really have to know whom you’re buying from, says Mike Kolb, founder of sports nutrition company Xwerks. “You’ve probably seen CBD in little stores and your local 7-Eleven, but a lot of these products don’t actually contain CBD, or at least they don’t have as much as they claim. The cheaper brands that are popping up source all their hemp from China, which is known to contain a lot of heavy metals and other contaminants.” 







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